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Remembering Norio Ohga Blog category

Just a quick and sad note: Norio Ohga, the Sony Computer Entertainment founder who’s generally credited with inventing the CD, died earlier this week. His design for the compact disc was hugely influential and paved the way for DVDs, Blu-Rays, and CD-ROMs. The CD was a crucial piece of technology for gaming’s coming-of-age, and it’s always unfortunate and a little distressing to see crucial figures from gaming history passing on. It’s a testament not only to how old this technology is, but also to how far we have come in just three decades or so.

Gravity Balls Action categoryMacintosh category

Title screen from Gravity Balls

Oftentimes, the simplest games are the most fun. When a formula doesn’t have much nuance or complexity, it can engage the player without being prohibitively hard to learn.

Enter Gravity Balls. There’s nothing brilliant about the design; in fact, the idea is simple enough that anyone could code it. But it’s so goddamn infuriating, and I can’t stop playing it. Gravity Balls » Read more

Zephyr Action categoryRacing categoryShooter category

Title screen from Zephyr

If there’s one concept that games have perfected, it’s the futuristic blood sport. Sure, movies like The Running Man came first, but Smash TV, MadWorld, and their ilk turned those fantasy game shows interactive and pretty much left no room for improvement. Just don’t tell that to Zephyr.

Designed by the team behind the Might and Magic series, Zephyr nails the hubbub of a gleefully televised cavalcade of murder. Nearly every second features a fictional sponsor, a cheesy commentator, and 90s electronic rock music. The ultraviolent vision is top-to-bottom perfect – including the bits where the rookies needlessly, endlessly die. Zephyr » Read more

Music Highlight: The Labyrinth of Time Music Highlights category

Music Highlight

Hey boys and girls! I decided that during downtime when I’m busier, I would throw some content up in the form of music highlights! So many of these weird old games have great tunes in them, so it’s worth pointing out some of the good ones.

This first one is the stock music piece “Telecom” used in The Labyrinth of Time in 1993. Whenever people reach out about the music from The Labyrinth of Time, “Telecom” is one of the bits that always gets the most praise. Understandably so; especially compared to the rest of the game’s music, “Telecom” is moving, complex, and multilayered. The last segment of the song richly combines half a dozen disparate instruments into a strange and elaborate noisescape.

The Labyrinth of Time‘s soundtrack consists of a 20-minute-or-so loop of music from the production archives at APM Music. This particular song by James Asher came from the album “Industry 2,” which seems to be filled with the blaring synth music that you’d find in a corporate training video in the 80s. With a few exceptions, the rest of the album is painful to hear. Thank goodness at least one interesting – nay, stellar! – track came out of it.

The Lost Mind of Dr. Brain Educational categoryPuzzle category

Title screen from The Lost Mind of Dr. Brain

Quick, name the best edutainment game.

No, not The Oregon Trail again. Think harder.

The game you just thought about probably taught a single subject really, really well. Classics like Carmen Sandiego, Math Blaster, or even Mario’s Time Machine all focused on a single topic – geography, math, history, etc. – and drove it into children’s skulls with the hawkishnses of a car salesman, hoping they’d retain at least a little bit of whatever subject.

The Lost Mind of Dr. Brain is a little more ambitious if generalized in scope. It tackles the subject of brain functions, trying to expand players’ minds in comprehension, logic, spatial cognition, and linguistics. Not only does it work, it’s fun, and I had just as good of a time playing it as a twentysomething as I did as a hyperactive kid. The Lost Mind of Dr. Brain » Read more

Lighthouse: The Dark Being Adventure category

Title screen from Lighthouse: The Dark Being

The company Sierra On-Line was once a titan of the adventure game genre. Though their style of extra-difficult, character-driven, third-person adventure stories eventually fell out of favor to the first-person, contemplative solitude of Myst, they took one shot at that new genre mode with Lighthouse: The Dark Being.

On its surface, Lighthouse reads like notes from a committee meeting that tried to nail down what made Myst successful. You visit a bizarre uncharted world where you solve complicated puzzles in a open-ended locales with complex mythology and lots of journals to read. Almost in spite of that copycat-ery, Lighthouse leaves its own touches on how that sort of game can fill its setting with risk and conflict. Its twisted world delights more than its components suggest.

UPDATE: Lead designer Jon Bock shares some insight into the unusual art direction and story for this self-described “science-fiction folk tale.” Lighthouse: The Dark Being » Read more

The Labyrinth of Time Adventure category

Title screen from The Labyrinth of Time

The bizarre and the mundane shine inseparably in The Labyrinth of Time, an adventure game by Terra Nova Development. Mainly the design of artist Bradley W. Schenck, the game throws mythology, retrofuturism, and art history together into an odd concoction that, rather than come out as a disparate mess, heightens the ordinary and grounds the imaginative. The titular labyrinth is a setting of enormous creativity bound into maze form. The Labyrinth of Time » Read more

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